Gneiss House

Low-pressure home metamorphism

Spring #2

Spring has sprung, and with it yard work! I have been working to get the yard ready for spring, take notes on what I want to change or add for next year, and begin the planting and yardwork seasons.

First, I ordered my seeds over the winter, and got everything in the ground that should go in before the last hard frost (peas, one strawberry plant, cauliflower, onions, carrots), and since we had a few warm days in a row in mid-March, I transplanted the hardy parsley and cilantro that made it through the winter to new areas. Then while I waited for the last frost, I started removing obvious weeds from the yard, cleaned up sticks that fell in the recent winter storms, and accumulated tools and replacements, like new work gloves.

Early April was warm unseasonably early, which was refreshing after such a cold March and delayed spring flowering. Once we were clearly safely past the last frost, a little before mid-April, I planted the post-frost seeds (the other herbs except for basil, an extensive oversow of my alternative lawn mix with some viola seeds added in, and a few other flowers to try out) and trimmed the rose bushes (FINALLY, I can walk around them without getting stuck with thorns!). We had some heavy rain right after I sowed, so while I’m concerned that some areas may have washed out a little, overall the cool nights plus rainy weather seems to have forced germination within just a few days.

The spring report so far: my magnolia tree was, as always, a sight to behold:

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And the other early spring flowers, most of which were planted by the previous homeowner, came in nicely, if a big sparse. I now know that I will want to fill in the yard substantially this fall with early spring bulbs, to really bring out that show.

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The ground is still pretty bare, but we’re starting to see some flowers–the forsythia looked beautiful this year. (Dog for scale.)

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Author: Lumberjack Lynne

Geologist by trade, redesigning my little piece of property so it's greener, friendlier, and my very own.

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