Gneiss House

Low-pressure home metamorphism

Basement Floor, Part 2

2 Comments

After my last post, I continued restoring my basement floor by adding a polyurethane topcoat. I used the leftover polyurethane from refinishing my hardwood floors (Zar Ultra Max brand), but I was significantly less concerned with a perfect appearance this time. The floor is already uneven and this is more for safety and utility than aesthetics. I didn’t end up using a pole applicator because the applicator cloths are meant for smooth floors and would snag on the rough areas, so instead I just used a big paintbrush and went to town. I applied the coat more liberally than I would have with a hardwood floor (since with hardwood, you want it to look very even with no milky areas or big droplets, so you want really thin, even coats), so I wouldn’t have to do more than one topcoat layer. I missed a few spots and had to go back and touch them up, but overall it was a quick job (if a little hard on my back and knees).

Due to my geology teaching profession, I may have also come into a few sets of lightly-used, vinyl orthomimid and small theropod trackways…

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(Tip: If you want to do this with any kind of floor decals, map out and lay down the decals before applying the topcoat. Then they won’t rip or peel up, no matter how much traffic the floor receives, and cleaning will be easy.)

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Author: Lumberjack Lynne

Geologist by trade, redesigning my little piece of property so it's greener, friendlier, and my very own.

2 thoughts on “Basement Floor, Part 2

  1. Are you going to have students do height and speed measurements on your theropod tracks?

    • My students already did that at work! These are the leftovers. šŸ™‚ But I laid these out at a walking pace, not a full-speed running stride length, so they wouldn’t work very well for calculating running speeds. (They just look better this way.)